Ocean Beach

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Del Mar

Del Mar is an affluent beach city in San Diego County, California. The population was 4,161 at the 2010 census, down from 4,389 at the 2000 census. The Del Mar Horse Races are hosted on the Del Mar racetrack every summer. Del Mar is Spanish for “of the sea” or “by the sea”, because it is located on the Pacific Ocean. Colonel Jacob Taylor purchased 338 acres (1.37 km2) from Enoch Talbert in 1885, with visions of building a seaside resort for the rich and famous. The United States Navy operated a Naval Auxiliary Air Facility for blimps at Del Mar during World War II.
 
According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.8 square miles (4.7 km2). 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2) of it is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2) of it (3.94%) is water. At the southern edge of Del Mar is the Los Peñasquitos Lagoon.
Del Mar’s climate is considered sub-tropical / Mediterranean with warm, dry summers and mild winters, and is considered one of the most desirable climates world-wide. Temperatures exceed 85 °F (29 °C) only on a few occasions throughout the year and rarely drop below 62 °F (17 °C). The average daily temperature in Del Mar is approximately 71 °F (22 °C).
Del Mar is also one of few locations in which the Torrey Pine tree grows. The Torrey Pine is the rarest pine in the United States and only two populations of this endangered speciesexist. The Soledad Valley at the south of Del Mar severs two colony segments of the Pinus torreyana.

 

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Point Loma

 
Point Loma is a seaside community within the city of San Diego, California. Geographically it is a hilly peninsula that is bordered on the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, the east by the San Diego Bay and Old Town and the north by the San Diego River. Together with the Silver Strand / Coronado peninsula, the Point Loma peninsula defines San Diego Bay and separates it from the Pacific Ocean. The term “Point Loma” is used to describe both the neighborhood and the peninsula.
Point Loma has an estimated population of 47,981 (including Ocean Beach), according to the 2010 Census. The Peninsula Planning Area, which includes most of Point Loma, comprises approximately 4,400 acres.
Point Loma is historically important as the landing place of the first European expedition to come ashore in present-day California. The peninsula has been described as “where California began”. Today, Point Loma houses two major military bases, a national cemetery, a national monument, and a university, in addition to residential and commercial areas.
 

History

 
Loma is the Spanish word for hill. The original name of the peninsula was La Punta de la Loma de San Diego, translated as Hill Point of San Diego. This was later anglicized to Point Loma.
There were no permanent indigenous settlements on Point Loma because of a lack of fresh water. Kumeyaay people did visit Ocean Beach periodically to harvest mussels, clams, abalone and lobsters.
Point Loma was discovered by Europeans on September 28, 1542 when Portuguese navigator Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo (João Rodrigues Cabrilho in Portuguese) departed from Mexico and led an expedition for the Spanish crown to explore the west coast of what is now the United States. Cabrillo described San Diego Bay as “a very good enclosed port.” Historians believe he docked his flagship on Point Loma’s east shore, probably at Ballast Point. This was the first landing by a European in present-day California, so that Point Loma has been described as “where California began”.
 
More than 200 years were to pass before a permanent European settlement was established in San Diego in 1769. Mission San Diegoitself was in the San Diego River valley, but its port was a bayside beach in Point Loma called La Playa (Spanish for beach). The historic La Playa Trail, the oldest European trail on the West Coast,led from the Mission and Presidio to La Playa, where ships anchored and unloaded their cargoes via small boats. Part of the route became present-day Rosecrans Street.In his book Two Years Before the Mast, Richard Henry Dana, Jr. describes how sailors in the 1830s camped on the beach at La Playa, accumulated cattle hides for export, and hunted for wood and jackrabbits in the hills of Point Loma.The beach at La Playa continued to serve as San Diego’s “port” until the establishment of New Town (current downtown) in the 1870s.
Ballast Point got its name from the practice of ships discarding their ballast there on arriving in San Diego Bay and taking on ballast as they left for the open ocean. Fort Guijarros was constructed at Ballast Point in 1797.Ballast Point and La Playa are now on the grounds of Naval Base Point Loma.
The longtime association of San Diego with the U. S. military began in Point Loma. The southern portion of the Point Loma peninsula was set aside for military purposes as early as 1852. Over the next several decades the Army set up a series of coastal artillery batteries and named the area Fort Rosecrans.Significant U.S. Navy presence in San Diego began in 1901 with the establishment of the Navy Coaling Station in Point Loma.The Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego was commissioned in 1921 and theSan Diego Naval Training Center in 1923, both in Point Loma;[13] the Naval Training Center was closed in 1997. During World War II the entire southern portion of the peninsula was closed to civilians and used for military purposes, including a battery ofcoast artillery. Following the war the area retained multiple Navy commands, including a submarine base and a Naval Electronics Laboratory; they were eventually consolidated into Naval Base Point Loma. Other portions of Fort Rosecrans became Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery and Cabrillo National Monument.
 

The Greek theatre theTheosophists built in 1901.

Following the death in 1891 of Helena Blavatsky its founder, Katherine Tingley moved the headquarters of the Theosophical Societyto “Lomaland”, a hilltop campus in Point Loma overlooking the ocean.The facility with its unusual architecture and even more unusual lifestyles became an important source of music and culture for residents of San Diego between 1900 and 1920.Producing most of its own food,the Society also experimented widely with planting trees and crops such as eucalyptus and avocado, giving that formerly barren part of Point Loma its current heavily wooded character. The Lomaland site is now the campus of Point Loma Nazarene University.
During the 1920s there was a dirt airstrip known as Dutch Flats in what is now the Midway neighborhood of Point Loma. That is where Charles Lindbergh first tested and flew his airplane, The Spirit of St. Louis, which had been built in San Diego by theRyan Aeronautical Company. A U.S. Post Office now located on the site contains several historic plaques commemorating Dutch Flats and Lindbergh.

Landmarks

 
The best known landmark in Point Loma is the Old Point Loma lighthouse, an icon occasionally used to represent the entire city of San Diego. (It is sometimes incorrectly referred to as the “Old Spanish Lighthouse”; in fact it was built after California was admitted to the United States.) Perched atop the southern point that creates the entrance of the bay with Coronado, the small, two story lighthouse was completed in 1854 and first lit on November 15, 1855. At 422 feet (129 m) above sea level at the entrance of the bay, the seemingly good location for a lighthouse soon proved to be a poor choice, as fog and cloud within themarine layer often obscured the beam for ocean-going vessels. On March 23, 1891, the lighthouse ceased to be used for its original purpose, as a new lighthouse was built nearer sea level on the same southern point.The Old Point Loma Lighthouse is now partially open to the public and has been refurbished to its historic 1880’s interior. It is located within the Cabrillo National Monument, named after Juan Rodríguez Cabrillo, the first European explorer to see San Diego Bay. The lighthouse is listed on theNational Register of Historic Places.
In addition to the lighthouse, there are four other sites in Point Loma listed on the National Register of Historic Places: Cabrillo National Monument, the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Historic District, Naval Training Center San Diego, and Rosecroft.

Geography

 

 
On the west side of the peninsula there are sandstone cliffs along the ocean, called the Sunset Cliffs. Geologically these cliffs are known as the Point Loma Formation. They contain fossils, including dinosaur fossils, from the Late Cretaceous period, about 75 million years ago. The formation represents one of the few sites containing dinosaur fossils in the state of California. Overlying the Point Loma Formation is another Late Cretaceous deposit called the Cabrillo Formation, which crops out in various areas of Point Loma.
The top of the peninsula is fairly flat, reaches an elevation of 422 ft (129 m),and is capped by much younger sandstone and conglomerate deposits from the Pleistocene era, 1 million years or less in age. These flat-lying beds lie directly on top of the gently dipping Point Loma and Cabrillo formations. The gap in the sedimentary record, called an Angular unconformity, represents about 70 million years of non-deposition and/or erosion.
The cliffs on the ocean side of the peninsula are sheer and are undergoing constant erosion due to wave action. On the east side the land slopes into San Diego Bay more gradually, so that homes and developments go right to the water’s edge. At the northern end of the peninsula the cliffs and hills become lower, disappearing entirely in Ocean Beach and the Midway area, where the San Diego River flows.
Much of the Midway area is former marshland which has been filled in for development.In fact, the San Diego River used to flow through the Midway area into San Diego Bay, isolating Point Loma from San Diego. Because of fears that San Diego Bay might silt up, the river was diverted to its present course north of Point Loma by a levee built in 1877.Parts of Liberty Station and Point Loma Village are also fill land, reclaimed from sand spits and wetlands surrounding the Bay. The only remnant of the formerly extensive wetlands in Point Loma, aside from the riverbed itself, is a city-owned nature preserve called Famosa Slough State Marine Conservation Area, which branches off from the river near its mouth.

Neighborhoods

There are several distinct neighborhoods in the Point Loma peninsula.Most neighborhoods in Point Loma consist primarily of single family homes.The commercial and retail heart of the peninsula is called Point Loma Village. Its retail establishments serve local residents as well as yachting and sport fishing interests.The streets in Point Loma Village are lined with hundreds of jacarandatrees as a result of community beautification efforts. The newest commercial and retail area is found at Liberty Station, site of the former Naval Training Center San Diego, which also has residential and educational sections. The Midway district at the northern end of the peninsula, adjacent to the San Diego River and the I-5 and I-8 freeways, is primarily commercial and industrial with a few small residential developments.
Connected to Point Loma Village by a causeway is Shelter Island, which is actually not an island but a former sandbank in San Diego Bay. Shelter Island was developed in the 1950s after it was built up into dry land using material dredged from the bay.It is under the control of the Port of San Diego and contains hotels, restaurants, marinas, and public parkland.
The bayside residential area called La Playa lies somewhat north of the original La Playa, the beach where commercial and military ships anchored during the early days of the city. La Playa includes some of the most expensive homes in San Diego. Some bayfront homes have private piers for small boats.The hills above La Playa are known as the Wooded Area on the bay side of Catalina Boulevard (so called because of the many mature trees in the area), and the College Area on the ocean side (because of the proximity of Point Loma Nazarene College). The Sunset Cliffs neighborhood is on the west side, above ocean bluffs, and is known for its views of the Pacific Ocean.
Roseville, named for San Diego pioneer Louis Rose,encompasses the oldest settled part of the peninsula. Many Portuguese fishermen and fishing boat owners settled here more than 100 years ago. Some people refer to the area as “Tunaville” because of its association with the tuna-fishing fleet. The hilly area above Roseville is known as Fleetridge, named for its developer David Fleet, a son of Reuben H. Fleet.
The bayside hills between Rosecrans Street and Chatsworth Boulevard north of Nimitz Boulevard are known as Loma Portal.[3] A distinctive feature of this neighborhood is the location of street lights in the middle of several street intersections instead of on the sidewalk. Loma Portal lies directly in the takeoff pattern for planes from Lindbergh Field, making it the home of the “Point Loma Pause” where all conversation ceases temporarily due to airplane noise.The east-west streets in Roseville and Loma Portal are known as the “alphabetical author streets”. The streets are named for authors in alphabetical order from Addison to Zola, with a second partial cycle from Alcott to Lytton.
The northwest corner of the peninsula, where the San Diego River flows into the ocean, is a separate community known as Ocean Beach.The southern one-third of the Point Loma Peninsula is entirely federal land, including Naval Base Point Loma, Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery, and Cabrillo National Monument.

Fauna

The area contains multiple species of wildlife, both in the federal lands at the southern end of the peninsula (managed in part as an ecological reserve) and in the developed suburban areas.Mammals include raccoons, skunks, possums, bats, rabbits, California ground squirrels, gray foxes, and occasional coyotes.More than 300 species of birds have been observed in Point Loma, which lies on the Pacific Flyway migration route.
 
 

Tourism

Marine activities are mostly located on the Bay side of the peninsula, where there are three yacht clubs, including the San Diego Yacht Club which was home to the America’s Cup from 1988 to 1995. There are several small-boat marinas and a commercial sport fishing dock on the Bay side. There are other businesses related to yachting and fishing, such as marine supply stores, yacht brokerages, boat repair yards, and hotels and motels catering to fishing enthusiasts.Some restaurants and hotels have docks for customers who arrive by boat.
 
Tourists visit the cliffs on the western side of the peninsula for views of the ocean and the sunset – hence the name, Sunset Cliffs. There are surfing spots below the cliffs, such as Luscomb’s, Garbage Beach and New Break. The cliffs are unstable and can be dangerous; a woman died in a fall from the cliffs in December 2008,and other falls have resulted in injuries.
The Point Loma area has a number of hotels, restaurants, and local businesses. Located in the Voltaire business district, near Ocean Beach, is the Point Loma Youth Hostel, frequented by travelers from around the world.The San Diego Sports Arena and theSOMA concert venue are located in the Midway neighborhood of Point Loma.
 
 
 

Military

Point Loma is home to several major military installations including the US Navy’s SPAWAR program, the US Marine Corps’ Recruit Training Depot (MCRD San Diego) and Naval Base Point Loma. The Navy controls approximately 1,800 acres (730 ha) of Point Loma and provides employment to about 48,000 military personnel and civilians.
Naval Base Point Loma, at the southern end of Rosecrans Street in the La Playa area, is the home of Submarine Squadron 11, with several nuclear fast-attack submarines, and the Naval Mine and Anti-Submarine Warfare Command, including eight Avenger class mine countermeasures ships.[43] The naval base also houses extensive electronic and communications operations (including the formerNaval Electronics Laboratory) serving the Pacific Fleet. At the southern end of the peninsula is historic Fort Rosecrans, site of the U.S. Army’s Coast Artillery Corps during World War I and World War II. Fort Rosecrans also includes the Fort Rosecrans National Cemetery and the USS Bennington Monument.
The Naval Training Center San Diego served as a basic training facility for new Navy recruits for more than 70 years, as well as hosting many specialty schools providing advanced career training for sailors.In April 1997 the base was closed and these schools were moved to Recruit Training Command, Great Lakes, Illinois. The former site of the base is now Liberty Station, a 361-acre (1.46 km2) mixed-use redevelopment project that includes residential, office, retail, educational, and civic, arts and cultural districts.Liberty Station was developed by the City of San Diego and The Corky McMillin companies. It also includes a 9-hole golf course,a 46-acre waterfront park and a 100-acre (0.40 km)historic district listed with the National Register of Historic Places.

 

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West of I-5

“Oceanside Living is Good for Health”
The age-old wisdom that being near the seaside is good for your health may be true, Livescience studies suggest. People often focus on the threats the ocean poses to human health, whether it’s storms and floods, harmful algal blooms or pollution. But research shows that spending time by the ocean has many positive effects on health and well-being, epidemiologist Lora Fleming.
If San Diego is known for one thing, it would be for our gorgeous beaches. With 70 miles of pristine coastline, year-around sunshine and mild temperatures, you can enjoy the surf and sand almost any day of the year. For visitors and locals alike, the beach is a veritable wonderland and the place to spend entire days with family and friends.
From expansive sandy beaches, rocky cliffs, reefs, tide pools and everything in between, the beaches in San Diego are as varied as the California beach towns that were built around them. Discover beaches perfect for families and dogs, beaches coveted by the world’s top surfers, or to enjoy a fire, play volleyball, spot sea creatures or simply relax and people watch. One thing’s for sure, on any given day at any beach in San Diego, you’ll find a front row seat to a magnificent display of the western sky as the sun descents into the Pacific.
So grab your beach towels, slather on the sunscreen, and get out to explore some of the finest beaches in the world.

From San Onofre to Imperial Beach, the shoreline along San Diego’s majestic, sparkling coast and bays can be enjoyed year-around. Take your pick from wide, sandy beaches packed with amenities to more secluded shores tucked below sea bluffs. This is a list of beaches in the city of San Diego, California, USA. The beaches are listed in alphabetical order.

Black’s Beach
Cardiff By The Sea Beach
Carlsbad Beaches
Children’s Pool Beach
Coronado Beach
Del Mar Beach
Encinitas Beaches
Horseshoe Beach
Imperial Beach
La Jolla Cove
La Jolla Shores Beach
Leucadia Beach
Marine Street Beach
Mission Bay Beaches
Mission Beach
Ocean Beach
Pacific Beach
Point Loma Beach
San Onofre Beach
Sunset Cliffs
Torrey Pines State Beach
Tourmaline Surf Park
Windansea Beach
Wipeout Beach

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Crown Point

Crwon Point

Crown Point is located on the peninsula in the middle of Mission Bay within biking and walking distance of Mission Beach and Pacific Beach. It is a great neighborhood for active adults and children with access to parks, beaches and boardwalks. Mission Bay is a salt-water bay located south of Pacific Beach and is the largest man-made aquatic park in the United States. The Mission Bay Park consists of 4,235 acres approximately 46% of which is land and 54% water. Popular activities include wakeboarding, sailing, jet skiing and camping, as well as walking, jogging and cycling along the pedestrian path. Fiesta Island, a large peninsular park within Mission Bay, is home to many events including the Over-the-line tournament, charity walks and runs, bicycle races and time trials.

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Pacific Beach

Pacific Beach is a neighborhood of San Diego, bounded by La Jolla to the north, Mission Beach and Mission Bay to the south, Interstate 5 to the east and the Pacific Ocean to the west. While largely populated by young people, surfers, and college students, the population is becoming older, more professional, and more affluent due to rising property and rental costs. “P.B.,” as it is known as by local residents, is home to one of San Diego’s larger nightlife scenes, with an expansive variety of bars, eateries, and clothing stores.
 
 Pacific Beach’s namesake stretches for miles from the Mission Bay jetty to the cliffs of La Jolla. The boardwalk, officially called Ocean Front Walk/Ocean Boulevard, is a pedestrian walkway that runs approximately 3.2 miles along the beach from the end of Law St. in the north down into Mission Beach, ending at the mouth of Mission Bay in the south. There are numerous local shops, bars, and restaurants along the boardwalk, and it is generally crowded with pedestrians, cyclists, rollerbladers, and shoppers. Also adjacent to the boardwalk is the Crystal Pier, a public pier and hotel at the west end of Garnet Avenue.
 
The streets in Pacific Beach were renamed several times before receiving their current designations in 1900. The primary north-south street running parallel to the beach is Mission Blvd., with the streets named after late 19th century federal officials, then incrementing in alphabetical order as they move further from the coast: Bayard, Cass, Dawes, Everts, Fanuel, Gresham, Haines, Ingraham, Jewell, Kendall, Lamont, Morrell, Noyes, Olney, and Pendleton. Mission Boulevard was formerly Allison Street, being the “A” street of the series.

 

The east-west streets are mostly named after precious stones. Starting at the north end of Mission Blvd. and heading south, the streets are:
  • Agate
  • Turquoise
  • Sapphire
  • Tourmaline
  • Opal
  • Loring
  • Wilbur
  • Beryl
  • Law
  • Chalcedony
  • Missouri
  • Diamond
  • Emerald
  • Felspar
  • Garnet
  • Hornblend
  • Grand
  • Thomas
  • Reed
  • Oliver
  • Pacific Beach Drive
Pacific Beach was developed during the boom years of 1886-1888 by D. C. Reed, A. G. Gassen, Charles W. Pauley, R. A. Thomas, and O. S. Hubbell. It was Hubbell who “cleared away the grainfields, pitched a tent, mapped out the lots, hired an auctioneer and started to work”. To attract people, they built a Race Track and the San Diego College of Letters, neither of which survive today. A railway also connected Pacific Beach with downtown San Diego, and was later extended to La Jolla.
As with many California cities, the history of its development can be traced back to the completion of a cross-country railroad in the late 1880s. In 1902, lots sold for between $350–700 for ocean-front property and by 1950, the population of Pacific Beach reached 30,000 and the average home sold for $12,000. Nonetheless, a small number of farms remained. Today, homes can sell for millions.
The United States Navy operated an anti-aircraft training center at Pacific Beach duringWorld War II. During the 1960s, development continued to increase with the city’s investment in Mission Bay Park, including the developments of the Islandia, Vacation Village and Hilton Hotels. In 1964 Sea World opened, which is located only a few miles from Pacific Beach.
Today, Pacific Beach is home to a younger crowd, including college students, single professionals, and families. The restaurant and nightlife culture has grown extensively, with Garnet Avenue becoming the major hub for places to eat, drink, and shop, and includes a range of bars, restaurants, pubs, and coffee houses.

 

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Mission Bay

Mission Bay is a saltwater bay or lagoon located south of the Pacific Beach community of San Diego, California. The bay is part of the recreational Mission Bay Park, the largest man-made aquatic park in the country, consisting of 4,235 acres (17.14 km2), approximately 46% land and 54% water. The combined area makes Mission Bay Park the ninth largest municipally-owned park in the United States.
Wakeboarding, jet skiing, sailing, and camping are popular on the bay. With miles of light color sandy beaches and an equally long pedestrian path, it is equally suitable for cycling, jogging, roller skating and skateboarding, or sunbathing.
Mission Bay Yacht Club, on the west side of the bay, conducts sailing races year-round in the bay and the nearby Pacific Ocean and has produced national sailing champions in many classes.
Fiesta Island, a large peninsular park located within Mission Bay, is a popular location for charity walks and runs, bicycle races, time trials and other special events. It is also the home of the annual Over-the-line tournament.
Mission Bay is also host to the annual Bayfair Cup, which is a hydroplane boat race that takes place on the H1 Unlimited circuit.
 
Mission Bay Park was originally a tidal marsh that was named “False Bay” by Juan Rodriguez Cabrillo in 1542. It was developed into a recreational water park during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s.
The San Diego River had historically shifted its terminus back and forth between San Diego Bay to the south and “False Bay” to the north. During the 1820s the river began to empty primarily into San Diego Bay, causing worries that the harbor might silt up. In 1852 the United States Army Corps of Engineers constructed a dike along the south side of the river to prevent water from flowing into San Diego Bay. This made “False Bay” an estuary outlet for the San Diego River drainage. Unfortunately the dike failed within two years. Finally in 1877 the city erected a permanent dam and straightened the river channel to the sea, giving the river its present configuration.Today the San Diego River is constrained on both the north and the south by levees (San Diego River Flood Control Channel), and it no longer drains to the ocean through Mission Bay, other than through a weir located at the entrance to Mission Bay.
During the late 1800s some recreational development began in “False Bay” including the building of hunting and fishing facilities. These facilities were destroyed by flooding that took place years later.
In 1944, a Chamber of Commerce committee recommended development of Mission Bay into a tourism and recreational center, in order to help diversify the City’s economy, which was largely military.
In the late 1940s, dredging and filling operations began converting the marsh into what today is Mission Bay Park. Twenty-five million cubic yards of sand and silt were dredged to create the varied land forms of the park, which now is almost entirely man-made.
Approximately one half of the park was once state tidelands. Mission Bay Park was transferred to the City of San Diego with several restrictions, some of which were adopted into San Diego City Charter by public vote, with others implemented as part of the California Coastal Commission’s oversight of local planning and land use decisions. One of the restrictions sets a limit on commercial development of leaseholds, so that no more than 25% of the land area and 6.5% of the water area can be used for private purposes. This assures that most of the acres making up Mission Bay Park are available for public recreational use.

 

Mission Bay has 27 miles (43 km) of shoreline, 19 of which are sandy beaches with eight locations designated as official swimming areas. Mission Bay is recognized for protection by the California Bays and Estuaries Policy.
Swimmers and sunbathers take advantage of the warm water, calm surf conditions and the sands of Mission Bay’s beaches. Mission Bay offers boat docks and launching facilities, sailboat and motor rentals, bike/walk paths and basketball courts. There are playgrounds for children. Public restrooms and showers are available, and lifeguard stations are located in designated areas.
On the east side of the bay is a network of channels and islands which are used by wind surfers and water skiers.
Several of the water areas are dedicated or restricted to particular forms of water recreation, with specific separate areas for sailing, water skiing and personal watercraft use.
Mission Bay is one of the premier locations in Southern California for the sport of rowing, or “crew.” One of the largest rowing regattas in the country is held on Mission Bay each year: The San Diego Crew Classic is held in Mission Bay every spring, featuring two days of competition in eight-oared shells rowed by more than 100 college, club, and senior crews.
Rose Creek flows into Mission Bay from the north, creating a rich wetland area called the Kendall Frost Marsh.

 

 
Attractions at Mission Bay include SeaWorld, the Mission Bay Aquatic Center with classes in all kinds of water sports, Mission Bay Golf Course, and Belmont Park, which features the Giant Dipper Roller Coaster and other rides.
On shore there are activities such as golfing, picnicking, riding a bike along the paths, playing volleyball, or flying a kite.
There are nearly 14 miles (23 km) of bike paths along Mission Bay
Golfing
Scenic Mission Bay Golf Course and Practice Center, designed by Ted Robinson, former president of the American Society of Golf Course Architects, proudly opened its gates May 27, 1955 as a nine hole course. In the early 1960s Robinson designed what is now the 18-hole executive course. The 18-hole executive course, measuring 2,719 yards, sits on 46 acres in the heart of the City. It is the only golf course in San Diego with night lighting. Mission Bay Golf Course and Practice Center has been a long time favorite golf course for locals. It is where Tiger Woods won a Junior World title.
 
Dog Walking
Some areas in Mission Bay Park require dogs to be on leashes, other areas such as Fiesta Island are leash free, and still other areas do not allow dogs at all.
Camping
There is a youth campground located on Mission Bay’s Fiesta Island. Throughout the year youth groups with their leaders enjoy a full camping experience along with daytime water experiences and classes. A permit is required to use this site. It is unlawful for adults to camp, sleep overnight or lodge overnight anywhere in Mission Bay Park except as a leader of a permitted youth group.
Fishing
Fishing is permitted in all areas of Mission Bay, except in areas designated for swimming, water skiing and personal water craft use (including take off and landing zones). Fishing is also not allowed from any bridge.
Birds
Mission Bay Park is home to many rare & endangered species, including the California Least Tern. Now in its thirteenth year, a program goes into effect every April through August to protect the endangered California least tern at four of its nesting sites in Mission Bay Park. The California Least Tern has more than tripled since it was put on the endangered species list, and has many colonies from San Diego Bay to the San Francisco Bay area. Most are fenced and protected from public access. The major cause for its decline was habitat destruction/alteration, as occurred in Mission Bay. Predators like a Gull-billed Tern, or a red fox on the colony can decimate a crop of chicks, and therefore, predator control, either by removal or elimination, has been instigated at some colonies. Non-endemic ants are a problem at some Mission Bay colonies, eating chicks alive, and are often controlled there. But, even with annual losses from depredation, ever since the Least Tern was listed, it has continued to thrive. Being on the Endangered Species list allowed protection of the terns’ habitat, and allowed the natural rebound and growth of the colonies. Colonies at Mission Bay are either fenced or reachable only by watercraft.

 

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Little Italy

Little Italy is a somewhat hilly neighborhood in Downtown San Diego, California that was originally a predominately Italian fishing neighborhood. It has since been gentrified and now Little Italy is a scenic neighborhood composed mostly of Italian restaurants, Italian retail shops, home design stores, art galleries, and residential units.
Little Italy is one of the more active downtown neighborhoods and has frequent festivals and events including a weekly farmers market, also known as the Mercato (the Market, in Italian). The neighborhood has low crime rates when compared with other neighborhoods in Downtown San Diego and is maintained by the Little Italy Neighborhood Association, which looks after trash collection, decorations, and special events.
 
Little Italy is located in the northwest end of Downtown, just a few blocks away from the Embarcadero. It is located north of Columbia, south of Middletown, southeast of Core, and west of Cortez Hill. It is also located on a hill thus giving its hilly terrain.
This district is bordered by West Laurel Street to the north, West Ash Street to the south,Interstate 5/Front Street to the east and the San Diego Bay and Pacific Highway to the west.
India Street, the commercial corridor, runs through heart of Little Italy, intermingled with high-density mixed-use buildings and single-family bungalow style historic properties in a highly walkable 48 square block area.
 
From the 19th century through the 1970s, people from Italy led the enterprise in the building the boats to found the American tuna fishing fleet and canning industry based in San Diego, the “tuna capital” of the Western US. The first large tuna cannery, the Pacific Tuna Canning Company, was founded in 1911. By the mid-1930s the canneries employed more than 1,000 people. Due to rising costs and foreign competition the last of the canneries closed in the early 1980s. A large fishing fleet supported the canneries, mostly staffed by immigrant fishermen from the Portuguese Azores and Italy, whose influence is still felt in neighborhoods like Little Italy and Point Loma.
Following the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire, other families then moved to live at the San Diego “Little Italy” fishing colony from the Italian Riviera and from Sicily. In the 1970s, the interstate freeway construction split the neighborhood. There is a sculpture dedicated to the cannery workers in Barrio Logan and a “Tunaman’s Memorial” statue on Shelter Island.

 

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La Jolla

La Jolla is an affluent neighborhood in San DiegoCalifornia. It is a hilly seasidecommunity, occupying 7 miles (11 km) of curving coastline along the Pacific Ocean within the northern city limits. La Jolla had the highest home prices in the nation in 2008 and 2009; the average price of a standardized four-bedroom home in La Jolla was reported as US $1.842 million in 2008 and US $2.125 million in 2009.The 2004 estimated population of the 92037 ZIP code was 42,808  while the La Jolla community planning area had an estimated population of 31,746 in 2010. La Jolla is surrounded on three sides by ocean bluffs and beaches and is located 12 miles (19 km) north of Downtown San Diego, and 40 miles (64 km) south of Orange County California, The climate is mild, with an average daily temperature of 70.5 °F (21.4 °C) La Jolla is home to a variety of businesses in the areas of lodging, dining, shopping, software, finance, real estate, bio-engineering, medical practice and scientific research.
The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) is located in La Jolla, as are the Salk InstituteScripps Institution of OceanographyScripps Research Institute, and the headquarters of National University (though its academic campuses are elsewhere).

Neighborhoods

  • La Jolla Farms – This northern La Jolla neighborhood is just west of UCSD. It includes the Torrey Pines Gliderport, the Salk Institute, and a group of expensive homes on the cliffs above Black’s Beach.
  • La Jolla Shores – The residential area and the Scripps Institution of Oceanography campus along La Jolla Shores Beach and east up the hillside. Also includes a small business district of shops and restaurants along Avenida de la Playa.
  • La Jolla Heights – The homes on the hills overlooking La Jolla Shores. No businesses.
  • Hidden Valley – Lower portion of Mount Soledad on the northern slopes. No businesses.
  • Country Club – Lower Mt. Soledad on the northwest side, including the La Jolla Country Club golf course.
  • Village – Also called Village of La Jolla (not to be confused with La Jolla Village) the “downtown” business district area, including most of La Jolla’s shops and restaurants, and the immediately surrounding higher density and single family residential areas.
  • Beach-Barber Tract – The coastal section from Windansea Beach to the Village. A few shops and restaurants along La Jolla Boulevard.
  • Lower Hermosa – Coastal strip south of Beach-Barber Tract. No businesses.
  • Bird Rock – Southern coastal La Jolla, and the very lowest slopes of Mt. Soledad in the area. Notable for shops and restaurants along La Jolla Boulevard, five traffic roundabouts on La Jolla Boulevard, coastal bluffs, and surfing areas just two blocks off the main drag.
  • Muirlands – Relatively large area on western middle slope of Mt. Soledad. No businesses.
  • La Jolla Mesa – A strip on the lower southern side of Mt. Soledad, bordering Pacific Beach. No businesses.
  • La Jolla Alta – A master planned development east of La Jolla Mesa. No businesses.
  • Soledad South – Southeastern slopes of Mt. Soledad, all the way up to the top, east of La Jolla Alta.
  • Muirlands West – The small neighborhood between Muirlands to the south, and Country Club to the north. No businesses.
  • Upper Hermosa – Southwestern La Jolla, north of Bird Rock and east of La Jolla Blvd.
  • La Jolla Village – Not to be confused with the Village (of La Jolla). In northeast La Jolla, east of La Jolla Heights, west of I-5 and south of UCSD. The neighborhood’s namesake is the La Jolla Village Square shopping and residential mall, which includes two movie theaters.

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Clairemont Mesa

Clairemont Mesa is a suburban neighborhood in northern San Diego with a population of 80,000.
It includes the separate neighborhoods of North Clairemont, South Clairemont, Clairemont Mesa East and Clairemont Mesa West. It is bordered by State Route 52 in the north, Interstate 805 in the east, Interstate 5 in the west, and the neighborhood of Linda Vista on the south.
The neighborhood was first developed in the post-war building boom of the 1950s.

Tecolote Canyon Golf Course is in the bottom of the southern canyon area. There are streams and trails that extend into finger canyons in the area. Wildlife is seen throughout the canyons. This includes coyotes, wild green parrots and the owls which Tecolote Canyon is named after. Trails extend through the bottom of the canyons for hiking or mountain biking.

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